The (pseudo)science of Thalassa

This page will tell you about the warped science behind the ideas in the Thalassa books.

Let me begin with an admission – I am by nature a perfectionist and a pedant (which probably explains my oh-so-exhausting social life). But when I write, I get to exercise my dark side. I let it all hang out, and bend the laws of physics to my will, bwa ha ha! Or rather, I bend the laws of physics to make what I think is good for the story.

I have nothing against hard sci-fi. But so far I haven’t written a book that requires slavish adherence to the rules of the universe (at least, not the universe I’m in now). So I cut a few corners. This page will tell you a bit more about where and how those corners get cut. Whatever and wherever, I always like the mechanisms behind the effects to be scientifically plausible, even if the magnitude/timescale/insert other get-out clause is grossly unrealistic.

I know. It’s fake science. The worst kind. But this is fiction, remember?

A whiter shade of pale – N350 and ultramarine vision. More soon…

You’re going to need a bigger boat – the torrential Tectocalypse. Read more.

What a drag! – submarines and supercavitation. More soon…

Life under the ocean wave – Cousteau finds Nemo, finally. More soon…

You catch my drift; more soon…

Header image: Not Tethys, but the Hydrolab in the Bahamas, a precursor to the underwater settlements that saved humanity (By Ariel Roth (Ariel Roth – Hydrolab occupant) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons)